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A blog promoting responsible and realistic environmental and animal welfare. News, articles, signal boosts, and general information will be posted here.

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Formerly petakills

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cupsnake:

lady-hen:

THIS IS HOW TO HOLD CHICKENS!


Reblogged this without saying anything whoops.The center of gravity is weird on chickens, guys! Don’t grab them from the back, and don’t support them by breast alone! Both are risky. Support should be between the legs and to the front, not back like some folks seem predisposed to after having pets like cats where you need to hold up the rump.Those forming eggs aren’t wrapped in bubble wrap, you know. They CAN be broken inside a hen, and that is an emergency situation. If you don’t know how to pick up a chicken, perhaps do not until someone has shown you in person how. I know they’re really cute and you want to hug the ASAP, but you don’t wanna risk the poor thing’s life for it.

cupsnake:

lady-hen:

THIS IS HOW TO HOLD CHICKENS!

Reblogged this without saying anything whoops.

The center of gravity is weird on chickens, guys! Don’t grab them from the back, and don’t support them by breast alone! Both are risky. Support should be between the legs and to the front, not back like some folks seem predisposed to after having pets like cats where you need to hold up the rump.

Those forming eggs aren’t wrapped in bubble wrap, you know. They CAN be broken inside a hen, and that is an emergency situation. If you don’t know how to pick up a chicken, perhaps do not until someone has shown you in person how. I know they’re really cute and you want to hug the ASAP, but you don’t wanna risk the poor thing’s life for it.

mindblowingscience:

Ravens can figure out who’s the boss by watching unfamiliar birds

Humans and other primates aren’t the only members of the animal kingdom who can watch total strangers interact and figure out who’s in charge. Ravens can do it too, according to a new study in the journal Nature Communications.
Researchers at the University of Vienna said they had several reasons to suspect that ravens had the chops to understand the social hierarchy of unknown birds just by looking at them. For starters, ravens “are renowned for their relatively big brains,” they wrote.
Among other things, these noggins allow them to switch between foraging in groups and looking out for themselves. Their big brains also seem to help them keep track of social relationships that have nothing to do with reproduction (usually an aminal’s top priority). Some ravens have even been known to console their buddies after losing a fight.
So the researchers selected 16 captive members of the Corvus corax species and rotated them through an aviary to give them a chance to see and hear other birds, though they remained physically separated. Then the researchers played audio of other birds from hidden loudspeakers.
Some of these “vocal interactions” reflected the actual social hierarchy of the group. Other audio clips had the dominance and submissive calls scrambled, to mimic a reversal in rank.
When the male ravens heard the clips that didn’t match their expectations, they seemed to withdraw (perhaps to give themselves a chance to figure out what was going on). The birds “reduced their vocalizations” and “tended to reduce their behaviors indicative of showing attention,” the researchers found. The female ravens, in contrast, didn’t seem too concerned about the scrambled recordings.
The story was different when the researchers played audio clips of ravens in the test subjects’ own social groups. In these cases, clips that didn’t match the birds’ expectations caused them to stress them out,  especially the female birds, the researchers found. This may be because female ravens try to boost their own rank by bonding with males, according to the study. But the clips that reinforced their (accurate) ideas about the social hierarchy of their feathered friends were taken in stride.
“This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration that non-human animals may recognize the rank relations of out-group members,” the researchers wrote. “This corresponds to the observations that ravens are excellent in monitoring, and actively intervening, in status-related interactions of other ravens.” 

mindblowingscience:

Ravens can figure out who’s the boss by watching unfamiliar birds

Humans and other primates aren’t the only members of the animal kingdom who can watch total strangers interact and figure out who’s in charge. Ravens can do it too, according to a new study in the journal Nature Communications.

Researchers at the University of Vienna said they had several reasons to suspect that ravens had the chops to understand the social hierarchy of unknown birds just by looking at them. For starters, ravens “are renowned for their relatively big brains,” they wrote.

Among other things, these noggins allow them to switch between foraging in groups and looking out for themselves. Their big brains also seem to help them keep track of social relationships that have nothing to do with reproduction (usually an aminal’s top priority). Some ravens have even been known to console their buddies after losing a fight.

So the researchers selected 16 captive members of the Corvus corax species and rotated them through an aviary to give them a chance to see and hear other birds, though they remained physically separated. Then the researchers played audio of other birds from hidden loudspeakers.

Some of these “vocal interactions” reflected the actual social hierarchy of the group. Other audio clips had the dominance and submissive calls scrambled, to mimic a reversal in rank.

When the male ravens heard the clips that didn’t match their expectations, they seemed to withdraw (perhaps to give themselves a chance to figure out what was going on). The birds “reduced their vocalizations” and “tended to reduce their behaviors indicative of showing attention,” the researchers found. The female ravens, in contrast, didn’t seem too concerned about the scrambled recordings.

The story was different when the researchers played audio clips of ravens in the test subjects’ own social groups. In these cases, clips that didn’t match the birds’ expectations caused them to stress them out,  especially the female birds, the researchers found. This may be because female ravens try to boost their own rank by bonding with males, according to the study. But the clips that reinforced their (accurate) ideas about the social hierarchy of their feathered friends were taken in stride.

“This is, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration that non-human animals may recognize the rank relations of out-group members,” the researchers wrote. “This corresponds to the observations that ravens are excellent in monitoring, and actively intervening, in status-related interactions of other ravens.” 

Anonymous said: I am moving for college. I have a dorm that will accept cats, so I plan to bring a barn-cat with me. Both my parents are allergic and refused to bring cats in the house, but they always adopted more and never wormed or took them to the vet. My cat is a 7 month old tom-cat, or at least, I want him to be mine. I want to get him neutered, checked by a vet, and de-wormed. Do you have any suggestions for other things I should do? He's super friendly and will even let you rub his tummy.

You’re going to need to provide a lot of stimulation for him, and be careful about him trying to get out. Once he’s inside he might not even be interested in the outdoors, I’ve heard of this happening on more than one occasion, but still - be careful, and make sure anyone you room with knows to keep an eye out when coming / leaving as well.

The American Bird Conservancy has a guide on how to transition an outdoor cat to an indoor cat, and Cat Behavior Explained has a page detailing the care needs of house cats.

For most anything else about cat care you can check our cat care page, or our cat care tag. If you have any other specific concerns feel free to message us again and we’ll be happy to help.

-Ry

raw-fed-pets:

Just a few tips for feeding bones safely to your dog.There are two types of bones raw feeders usually feed:

Recreational Bone (left):

-The primary purpose of rec bones is for teeth cleaning. They are very effective in this regard. Warning: Expect reflective pearly whites.

-Feed a few times a week as it suits. Ideally feeding large everyday would be good, but many people don’t have the freezer space for this.

-Must be meaty. Bare bones crack teeth and wear them down over time. Mustn’t be the weight-bearing bones of large animals (e.g. legs) as these also break teeth. Give your dog a meaty chunk he can sink his teeth into.

-Should be large to prevent your dog choking. Aim for a bone that is larger than your dogs head.

-These bones are generally not used as an edible bone/calcium source, but more as a meaty meal or activity (may cause constipation if whole bone fed). You can remove the bone once the dog has worked away all the meat. These bones also work out your dogs muscles, occupy his mind, and allow him to engage in instinctual behavior. Chewing also appears to be very calming for the dog (endorphins perhaps?). If your dog didn’t finish it, simply refreeze it for next time.

Edible bone (right):

-Around 10% of Prey Model Diet, but you can balance it out over the week/fortnight, as you would with your own diet. Doesn’t need to be exact, but I wouldn’t recommend feeding less than 10%, or more than 25% on a regular basis. If your dogs feces is white, you are feeding too much bone.

-Feed frozen if you have a gulper. Its a case of ‘know-your-dog’. Do not take any unnecessary risks with nervous fast eaters, or those that try to swallow food whole.

-Should be soft bone. Poultry, rabbit, and young animals (brisket/veal etc) are some examples. Raw chicken is the most commonly fed edible bone due to it being extremely soft and digestible. There is also a lot of information available about the bone percentage of chicken (usda database- click ‘full report’ on chosen meat e.g. wings are approx 38% bone).  Such bone is broken down into a gel-like substance in the dogs stomach.

-Introduce bone slowly to your dogs diet. Most start on bland boneless chicken for 1-2 weeks until their system has adjusted. If he/she has been eating kibble or processed food then his/her stomach is likely more alkaline than a raw fed dog’s, and needs time to adjust before tackling raw bone. Raw fed dogs have a natural highly acidic stomach PH level. This is effective for many reasons, primarily being the breakdown of bones and the prevention of food borne bacterial illness (unless immune compromised) when eating raw meat and offal.

-Feed edible bone that is size appropriate. Feeding a big dog chicken necks may present a choking hazard. Big dogs often do well on chicken frames, whereas toy dogs can eat smaller bones.

General Tips:

*It is recommend that you do not exercise your dog 1-2 hrs before, and after feeding any kind of food. This can increase the risk of bloat which can be deadly in minutes. Large breeds are more at risk. Encourage your dog to rest after dinner, and think about splitting his meal into 2-3 per day if he is an at-risk breed.

*Never ever feed cooked bones, as these are dangerous.Cooking changes the molecular structure of bones causing them to become brittle and easily splintered.

*Most of these apply to cats too, although they do well with just edible bone rather than rec bones.

*Always supervise the feeding of bones.

If Ive missed anything out feel free to add it. Photo on the right wasn’t meant to look so questionable. Bone Appetit.

"I am an Inuit seal meat eater, and my fur is ethical," wrote Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, bundled in a sealskin coat, pants and boots. She also wrote a letter to DeGeneres and posted it online.

Samsung vowed to donate $1 for every retweet of DeGeneres’ celebrity-packed Oscars selfie to a charity of her choice. She raised $1.5 million for the Humane Society of the United States, which campaigns annually against Canada’s seal hunt.

The Ellen DeGeneres Show’s website calls the seal hunt “one of the most atrocious and inhumane acts against animals allowed by any government.”

The Inuit have long defended the hunt as a sustainable practice, deeply rooted in Inuit culture, which helps feed people in a region plagued by hunger.

"The meat feeds families, which is important to an area where many households have identified that they face issues of food insecurity," said Sandi Vincent, who posted her own sealfie Thursday.

The pelts also come in handy in the cold northern climate and provide a needed source of income, she said. She also countered the idea of the hunt as “inhumane.”

"In Inuit culture, it is believed seals and other animals have souls and offer themselves to you. Humanely and with gratitude we accepted this gift," she said, reminiscing about catching her first seal at age 15.

pusysquart said: Hi there, I've been looking at getting a corn snake for a while now, and I was wondering if you could give me some books/resources to refer to so I know that I am prepared and that I can give the lil guy/girl the best life I can. I'm weary to just google "how to cornsnake lol" because the internet is rife with dumb people, and I figured I would ask here first. I will probably purchase through BHB Reptiles since they're in Oklahoma and I'm in Texas; but like I said, I want to be ready first.

superpredatorsexoticreptiles:

Corn snakes are the best starter snake in my opinion. I’ve never had a hard time with a Corn. Actually, my very first snake was a Corn snake someone had brought to my dad’s work thinking it was some sort of venomous snake. So my dad brought him home when I was just a toddler.

Some internet sources are great but I know what you mean, haha. If you plan on purchasing through any other source other than BHB, I recommend the BOI section on Fauna Classifieds. This allows you to search for any previous transactions that either may have gone very well or very bad. Here in FL there are so many Corn snake breeders it makes my head spin! One person I can recommend is Don Stipp. His website isn’t so great but I know he usually has lots of King Snakes and some Corn snakes. Maybe shoot him an e-mail.

As far as resources or books I can’t find any good ones online at the moment and I don’t know of any books that may be able to help.All I can give you is my personal experience with Corns. Some of my followers may have better resources for you though!

Here’s a general care sheet for snakes, courtesy of Reptile Veterinarians, and one for corn snakes by the same source. Here’s one specifically about corn snakes, posted by scalestails, and a whole corn snake website - which is UK based, so some info you may have to adjust accordingly. The Herp Center Network also has a care sheet for corns.

Of course, don’t take any of this as the law. These are guidelines, not a herp keeping Bible. Compare the information available and come to your own conclusions based on it, since you’re not likely to find the same exact information from various sources.

We also have a snake care section which you may want to look through, or our snake care tag, and don’t be afraid to speak with other snake owners!

-Ry

fuckyeahherpetology:

Snake Owner’s ToolkitI decided, based on my experiences working with venomous and constrictors, to write a basic toolkit that every snake owner should have in their snake room. Here’s a list and what each of these household (or not) items should be used for. 
Brown Listerine Antiseptic Mouthwash - The brown “non-scented/flavored” form is the best. With some alcohol in it and a nasty flavor this will remove a biting snake that just won’t let go. This is critical if you have large constrictors. It is also effective in cleaning out the oral cavity of a snake with an upper respiratory infection or mouthrot along with proper veterinary care.
Neosporin w/o Pain Relief - Do not get the type with pain relief, as it contains chemicals toxic to reptiles. This is a great thing to use on flesh wounds that could occur from a rodent bite or from a cage injury. As with the listerine, it is not a replacement for veterinary care but does help prevent infections in small wounds.
Snake Hook or Tongs - This tool will prove more useful than you think.  Large constrictors should be trained with hooks so they can discern feeding time from handling time. Even large colubrids (like my feisty 9ft blue beauty snake!) are sometimes easier to work with using tongs or hooks. Plus they are a great thing to have in the field or the car if you ever want to move snakes off the road! A MUST for working with venomous.
Temp Gun / IR Thermometer - One from home depot would work fine, but you don’t need one with an extreme range either. This allows you to measure accurate temperatures in a snakes enclosure without disturbing them. Another must for venomous.
Kitchen Scale - This is the one I have, and it’s worked great for 6 years! This is great for smaller species like corn snakes and ball pythons to track weights or to track weight loss in a non-feeding snake. Also good for breeding if you want to weigh gravid females, eggs, or babies.
PAM and Reptile Spray - No, not the kind in your kitchen. Prevent-A-Mite is a must for bringing in new animals (spray only the substrate w/o water bowl, follow instructions) to prevent mite outbreaks, and is also the most effective in treating mites if you already have them.  Reptile Spray can be used directly on the animal (unlike PAM) to help relieve some immediate discomfort. If you are having trouble with mold in your cages on your decor, BioShield works wonders.
Chlorhexidine - By far the best cleaning solution for your reptiles. For one, it’s cheap, and you dilute it 1 oz per gallon, so it lasts you forever! It also is safer than bleach solution and is not risky to our reptiles fragile respiratory systems. No rinsing or airing out needed.
Liquid Band-Aid - For breeders! If you ever have mold on eggs or a weak spot or even a tear, you can repair it with liquid bandaid. Works like a charm.
Leather Welding Glove - Not necessarily needed. Is useful if you have a particularly bitey squirmy snake that won’t sit on a hook. Some venomous keepers use these for small snakes or babies, but based on my experience I don’t recommend using gloves for venomous. Rear-fangs would probably be more acceptable to use this with.
This isn’t the stuff you’ll find at Petco but more likely online or at your local hardware store. Hope this is of some use to you, as these are often things recommended to keepers for certain issues and I thought making a concise list would be more helpful.Happy herping!

fuckyeahherpetology:

Snake Owner’s Toolkit

I decided, based on my experiences working with venomous and constrictors, to write a basic toolkit that every snake owner should have in their snake room. Here’s a list and what each of these household (or not) items should be used for.
 

  • Brown Listerine Antiseptic Mouthwash - The brown “non-scented/flavored” form is the best. With some alcohol in it and a nasty flavor this will remove a biting snake that just won’t let go. This is critical if you have large constrictors. It is also effective in cleaning out the oral cavity of a snake with an upper respiratory infection or mouthrot along with proper veterinary care.
  • Neosporin w/o Pain Relief - Do not get the type with pain relief, as it contains chemicals toxic to reptiles. This is a great thing to use on flesh wounds that could occur from a rodent bite or from a cage injury. As with the listerine, it is not a replacement for veterinary care but does help prevent infections in small wounds.
  • Snake Hook or Tongs - This tool will prove more useful than you think.  Large constrictors should be trained with hooks so they can discern feeding time from handling time. Even large colubrids (like my feisty 9ft blue beauty snake!) are sometimes easier to work with using tongs or hooks. Plus they are a great thing to have in the field or the car if you ever want to move snakes off the road! A MUST for working with venomous.
  • Temp Gun / IR Thermometer - One from home depot would work fine, but you don’t need one with an extreme range either. This allows you to measure accurate temperatures in a snakes enclosure without disturbing them. Another must for venomous.
  • Kitchen Scale - This is the one I have, and it’s worked great for 6 years! This is great for smaller species like corn snakes and ball pythons to track weights or to track weight loss in a non-feeding snake. Also good for breeding if you want to weigh gravid females, eggs, or babies.
  • PAM and Reptile Spray - No, not the kind in your kitchen. Prevent-A-Mite is a must for bringing in new animals (spray only the substrate w/o water bowl, follow instructions) to prevent mite outbreaks, and is also the most effective in treating mites if you already have them.  Reptile Spray can be used directly on the animal (unlike PAM) to help relieve some immediate discomfort. If you are having trouble with mold in your cages on your decor, BioShield works wonders.
  • Chlorhexidine - By far the best cleaning solution for your reptiles. For one, it’s cheap, and you dilute it 1 oz per gallon, so it lasts you forever! It also is safer than bleach solution and is not risky to our reptiles fragile respiratory systems. No rinsing or airing out needed.
  • Liquid Band-Aid - For breeders! If you ever have mold on eggs or a weak spot or even a tear, you can repair it with liquid bandaid. Works like a charm.
  • Leather Welding Glove - Not necessarily needed. Is useful if you have a particularly bitey squirmy snake that won’t sit on a hook. Some venomous keepers use these for small snakes or babies, but based on my experience I don’t recommend using gloves for venomous. Rear-fangs would probably be more acceptable to use this with.

This isn’t the stuff you’ll find at Petco but more likely online or at your local hardware store. Hope this is of some use to you, as these are often things recommended to keepers for certain issues and I thought making a concise list would be more helpful.
Happy herping!

thejunglenook:

Q: How can we quickly tell a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) from a Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) in the field? 

1. ColorationOther than the obvious head coloration differences (which you may / may not be able to spot when in the field) Turkey Vultures have a light underside to their flight feathers, giving them a two-toned appearance across their wings. Black Vultures have white shafts on their outer six primaries and white patches or ‘stars’, so their two-toned appearance is limited to the wing tip region.
2. Wing Shape
The Turkey Vulture has a greater dihedral angle (angle of the wings angled above horizontal) when compared to the Black Vulture’s soaring on horizontal (or slightly above horizontal) wings.  Of course, if you happen to be watching a mixed group of vultures you can also make an easy ID just by noticing the larger wingspan of the Turkey Vulture.

3. Tail Shape
Turkey Vultures have a long, rudder-like, round tail that extends well past their toes while in flight. Black Vultures have short bluntly rounded tails that hardly extend past their toes. 
4. Flying Style
Because Turkey Vultures are so light (64oz average with a 5 1/2 ft wingspan) so they can soar the thermals for extended periods of time with little to no flapping. When wing flapping is required, the wingbeats are measured and deep. (ex. Flap———— Flap ———— Flap———-) Being a (relative) lightweight isn’t all grace, these guys have a characteristic rocking motion to their soar as they get buffeted by thermal currents.Black vultures have a shorter wingspan and are heavier birds (68 oz average with a wingspan just shy of 5ft) so their wingload is higher and they rely on strong high thermals to stay aloft. They have shallow almost frantic wing beats in three to five rapid clusters. (Flap-Flap-Flap———- Flap-Flap-Flap-Flap———)

Bonus points go out to hyaenabee, ktsaurusr3x, primestigma, nomchimpsky for their excellent answers.Pun points to arrowsforpens because I really wish it was simply a difference of a pinion.

Read more about vultures here, here, here, and here! 

thejunglenook:

Q: How can we quickly tell a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) from a Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) in the field? 

1. Coloration

Other than the obvious head coloration differences (which you may / may not be able to spot when in the field) Turkey Vultures have a light underside to their flight feathers, giving them a two-toned appearance across their wings. Black Vultures have white shafts on their outer six primaries and white patches or ‘stars’, so their two-toned appearance is limited to the wing tip region.

2. Wing Shape

The Turkey Vulture has a greater dihedral angle (angle of the wings angled above horizontal) when compared to the Black Vulture’s soaring on horizontal (or slightly above horizontal) wings.  Of course, if you happen to be watching a mixed group of vultures you can also make an easy ID just by noticing the larger wingspan of the Turkey Vulture.

3. Tail Shape

Turkey Vultures have a long, rudder-like, round tail that extends well past their toes while in flight. Black Vultures have short bluntly rounded tails that hardly extend past their toes. 

4. Flying Style

Because Turkey Vultures are so light (64oz average with a 5 1/2 ft wingspan) so they can soar the thermals for extended periods of time with little to no flapping. When wing flapping is required, the wingbeats are measured and deep. (ex. Flap———— Flap ———— Flap———-) Being a (relative) lightweight isn’t all grace, these guys have a characteristic rocking motion to their soar as they get buffeted by thermal currents.

Black vultures have a shorter wingspan and are heavier birds (68 oz average with a wingspan just shy of 5ft) so their wingload is higher and they rely on strong high thermals to stay aloft. They have shallow almost frantic wing beats in three to five rapid clusters. (Flap-Flap-Flap———- Flap-Flap-Flap-Flap———)

Bonus points go out to hyaenabee, ktsaurusr3x, primestigma, nomchimpsky for their excellent answers.

Pun points to arrowsforpens because I really wish it was simply a difference of a pinion.

Read more about vultures here, herehere, and here

wolfforce58205 said: Do you have any good resources to give to someone who is dead-set on buying a Craigslist (BYB) German Shepherd? Both for shepherds and backyard breeders. My "friend" is trying to find the cheapest dog she can, stating she has $300 (that is ALL the money she can set aside) to spend on a puppy (she wants 8 weeks old) and everything it will need. She works most of the week and isn't home often. I KNOW she cannot handle a GSD, and she won't listen to anyone about not supporting a BYB. Please help!

Educate them on what’s wrong with BYB, if they’re not already aware of the issue.

Then help them recognize that the individual they intend to buy from is indeed a BYB, here’s some links on reputable vs. backyard breeders.

If they’re the type of person who wants to “save” the dog, discuss with them how they’re actually doing more harm than good because even though they gave that, one dog a good home since they’re supporting the industry countless other canines will be hurt as a result.

Then you can help them find a responsible breeder,

or even a rescue!

-Ry

stupid-american-trash said: I have a small poultry farm (all pets) and I take in rescues a lot. I posted an ad on Craigslist offering to take Easter bunnies/ducklings/chicks (all of which I have the time, money and room to care for). So many people get Easter animals without thinking and end up abandoning them. I've adopted out a good number of rescues and animals to screened approved homes, but I am getting stipulation from doing this from some people. What are your thoughts, is this really a good idea?

I’m a little confused as to how you’re trying to use ‘stipulation,’ here? Do you mean people are giving you conditions under which they’ll surrender their animals? 

Also, sorry we still haven’t responded to your fanmail. I’m not sure what to say yet and have been looking into it but I’m also busy so

-Ry

Tagged with: #stupid american trash  #asks