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August 2014
31
Via   •   Source

Pit Bull Phenotyping - A Guide

notapitbull:

 Phenotyping pit bulls can have it’s ups and downs. On one hand you have people phenotyping their bully breed mixes as pit bulls because it resembles one, and on the other hand you can tell the different breeds (and mixes) apart usually by phenotyping. It can be harder for the average person to distinguish between a purebred APBT with a mutt that looks really close to an APBT, and so that’s why I normally say to back up the claims that your mutt is an APBT with pedigree proof. Any purebred APBT breeder will be able to provide you with pedigrees, usually for no cost at all - they take pride in their work and want to show off years (even decades) of experience through pedigrees. You can ask your breeder for your dog’s sire and dam’s names and search them up on Google by typing in, for example Crenshaw’s Jeep pedigree.
You can even see the offspring of this dog if they are registered on that site.

 Generally speaking, pit bull terriers all follow the same general look. They’re thin but muscular, they have a slender, muscular face with a slight forehead stop (though not as defined as an American Bulldog or a Rottweiler):

Big Snake’s Ch Winston:
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Compared to a Rottweiler:
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and an American Bulldog (Scott-type):
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Staffordshire Bull Terriers have cute, round faces and a defined forehead stop:
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 They do not have chunky, jowly faces, and their heads aren’t massive. Jowly faces means risk of the dog “fanging” itself (getting one of it’s canines stabbed through it’s upper lip). There are some exceptions to this, and there are dogs with more square-looking heads and some slight neck folds, but these are the minority.

Eastside Kennel’s Redboy:
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Eastside Kennel’s Little Ruby:
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Big Snake’s Tito 1XW:
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(and a notable example of a more jowly, thicker-headed dog):

Latin Force Kennel’s GrCh Barracuda:
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(Although Barracuda’s jowly appearance could be due to scars, because he doesn’t look this way in other pictures)
Staffordshire Bull Terriers have very round faces with large, almond- shaped eyes:

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and American Staffordshire Terriers have faces similar to pit bulls, but with harsher angles:
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They are not 100lbs and they are not massive. If someone is telling you that their pit bull is 100lbs, they’re lying to your face, ignore them.

APBT rarely exceed 60lbs, and the ones that do are called catchweight. There is an actual fighting class for the super heavy dogs because they are a minority. They are also not big, they’re quite small dogs and rarely get above knee-height. In a dog-fight, the handlers were/are required to have their dogs between their legs before they scratch. How easy would this be if your dog was as big as people claim their pit bulls to be? Ridiculous. These dogs are meant to be extremely agile and fast, and a large dog like a Tosa or a Dogo Argentino would not make a good pit fighting dog due to this.

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Staffordshire Bull Terriers tend to be quite small, about half the size of an APBT. The best way I can describe one is to say that they’re “compact”. American Staffordshire Terriers are a little bigger than pit bulls and more “boxy”.
You can check out the size of some Staffordshire Bull Terriers in this video here.

They do not all have cropped ears. In fact, most APBT are left with natural ears. While pit bulls do tend to have rose ears when left natural, they can have any shape of ears, some of them even have bat ears. It’s a myth that all fighting dogs were/are cropped, it’s believed that cropping a dog puts your dog at risk of having his ear injured in a fight (but it would be impossible for another dog to puncture an eardrum even if the opponent was cropped). American Staffordshire Terrier breeders and American Bully breeders tend to crop most of their dogs due to standard, but since there’s no real standard amongst general pit bull fanciers, nobody cares about ear shape.

Boudreaux’s Badger ROM/POR
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Boudreaux’s Baaad Asss 2XW
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Ch Maloney’s Strider
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They do not have to be conditioned to be thin and athletic. A common misconception is that game bred dogs have a “look” to them and that if the dogs are not game bred, they’ll be chunkier, heavier, jowlier, etc. This is not true. Dogs that are extremely muscular and “ripped” are like this because their owner conditions them, or puts them on a “work out” routine and strict diet. Even when these dogs are not conditioned, they are still in good shape.

A well known “ripped” dog would be Marty’s Lilbit
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and some examples of “chainweight” dogs (dogs who are weighed when they’re taken right off the chain, ie. a dog who has not been conditioned)
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 Most of them are not blue or tricolour. The reason for this being that the people who own and breed APBT (mainly dogfighters) do not breed for appearance. Blue is a dilute gene and can crop up in this breed, but not to the extent that people are claiming it to by calling their blue/tri dogs “pit bulls”. You’ll notice that none of the photos I’ve provided so far have been blue dogs, this is not intentional and is merely a coincidence.

They are not short, squat dogs with thick necks and wide chests. They have normal proportions and are not squat. In fact, if we were going by the ADBA standards, this is what a champion ADBA dog looks like:

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That looks wildly different from this, does it not?
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(Found that Googling “Pit Bull”)

American Staffordshire Terriers tend to have thick necks and wide chests, but not to the extent that occurs in the American Bully world.

When I look at a dog that is claimed to be a “pit bull”, I examine the above and judge my phenotypes based on that. Knowing what you know now, would you be able to tell which dogs here are the APBTs?

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August 2014
31

Anonymous asked

Hello I would like to ask: if you were to have an open enclosure (so the creature could come and go) and an extremely large area of ocean, but giving the cetaceans access to come and go as they please with an incentive of food and no humans touch them apart from medical concerns: would you be for cetacean captivity if we could provide for them equal to or better than the wild?

Having an open enclosure so the creature can come and go? That’s just called being free, what you’re describing is whale watching. Going out on a boat and observing whales in nature without engaging them, as far as I’m aware that’s alright but I could be wrong.

Followers? Thoughts on whale watching?

As for the last bit of the ask, I wouldn’t have a problem if we could adequately care for them as we do with many other animals. But we can’t, I don’t know when that will change or if it ever will.

-Ry

August 2014
31

Anonymous asked

As far as I knows, they are rarely together because the senior dog just runs away/hides from the pup, however now will bite if the pup comes close enough (after the dad physical forced them together and encouraged the senior dog to growl and get aggressive)

Don’t force them together, try to just get them in the same room but a comfortable distance apart. Shower the senior dog with love and treats, gradually close the gap between the dogs.

-Ry

#anonymous   #asks   
August 2014
31

Anonymous asked

Hi! I was told to send you guys a message, cause I have an issue. My Bf's family senior dog isn't adjusting at all to a new puppy in the house, and she has spent the past 2 months in my bf's room or in the basement hiding from the puppy. My Bf's dad is now forcing the senior dog to not just socialize with, but bite and growl at the pup because he thinks she just needs to put the puppy in her place. They're both small dogs, but the pup is like, 1/5 of the size of the senior dog 1/2

The senior dog spends all of her time hiding in the basement/under (or in if she’s lifted up) my my bf’s bed. She’s been increasingly unhappy, and while she did initially growl at the pup the first week, every since that she’s just run away and hidden. The dad forcing her to bite and growl at the little dog concerns me, and I was wondering if you guys had any tips or resources I could pass along to my bf for his family on properly helping the senior dog adjust?

How does the Dad force the dog to “bite and growl” at the pup? Do you mean he’s forcing them to be together and that’s how the dog responds? Because that has nothing to do with “putting the pup in her place.”

Make sure they each have their own “safe space” away from one another, to retreat to as they please. When they’re in the same room together without fighting offer them a lot of praise and treats so they begin to realize that the other dog being around means they get nice things, also avoid playing favorites.

Introductions are crucial to multipet households but your boyfriend’s family seems to have botched that, so getting them to get along is a little more different. If you notice something triggers conflict or stress between them, such as a toy, remove it for the time being. Feeding them in separate locations may also be a good idea, at least for the time being.

-Ry

#anonymous   #asks   
August 2014
30
(via DVM Multimedia)

(via DVM Multimedia)

#pets   #pet care   #first aid   #health   #pet health   #dogs   #dog care   #domestic dogs   #canidae   #canine health   #poisoning   #choking   #seizures   #injury   
August 2014
30
Via   •   Source
beltedgalloways:

elevennineteenreptiles:

Please reblog!! Help get the word out to others about the animals that we love so much.

Waheyyy we all need some snakey lovin!!! This is brilliant :D

beltedgalloways:

elevennineteenreptiles:

Please reblog!! Help get the word out to others about the animals that we love so much.

Waheyyy we all need some snakey lovin!!! This is brilliant :D

August 2014
29

magnerdo asked

Hello! I was going through your blog and you should not ever recommend a pacific parrotlet as a starter bird. Budgerigars, cockatiels, lovebirds, finches, doves, quail, ducks, and chickens are all good starter birds, but parrotlets are as demanding as your average larger psittacine.

I’m not sure which post you’re referring to, could you link it? I’ll edit or remove it!

-Ry

#magnerdo   #asks   
August 2014
29

Anonymous asked

Do you have any advice for people who won't neuter their dogs? My dad has a Rottweiler who's just out of control and I told my dad that not only does he need to train him more but that if he neutered him he wouldn't be so crazy all the time but my dad just won't listen. He says it's mean to chop the dog's balls off. What can I do to try and convince him?

You can find some resources on of neutering here and here (under health), this post discusses the pro’s and con’s and you can also look through our neutering tag (or speutering, an older tag).

It’s alright if your Dad doesn’t neuter the dog, but he absolutely has to train him better. Try to focus on convincing him to work on training the dog, intact dogs can be just as well behaved as neutered dogs when properly trained.

-Ry

#anonymous   #asks   
August 2014
29

Anonymous asked

The only vegans I know are both poor, poc, trans women so when people say it's too expensive I just kind of am confused. However, I am absolutely against feeding vegan diets to carnivorous animals, as that's obviously wrong.

Poverty exists on a spectrum, there’s no one way to be “poor” and what some poor people can afford others can’t. Additionally, some poor people can afford it but not easily and may not be willing to just barely get by so they can be vegan, and that’s fine.

There’s also such a thing as “food deserts,” where certain foods (particularly various types of produce) are sparse so their prices are hiked way up where they are available. 

-Ry

#veg*nism   #anonymous   #asks