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July 2014
24
Via   •   Source
littleninarescue:

This is Little Nina.  We found her on the side of the road in Cleveland Ohio, covered in mud and getting splashed by cars. I picked her up with intentions of nursing her back to health. The vet was kind enough to give me a free exam, which was enough to tell me that she has a severe upper respiratory infection and extreme malnutrition. Her eyes were glued shit with yellow gunk when I found her. And the vet told me that she thought she was about 5 weeks old, but was the size of a 3 week old kitten.
We already have two cats, both of which are rescues. We have plans on keeping her, but this was such a surprise for us, we didn’t have time to budget in another cat. I was able to get a sample sized tube of antibiotics for her eyes, but she is going to need more very soon. And eventually she will need to be spayed.
I don’t want to have to give her up because we can’t afford to keep her. Nina has a gofundme account set up for her vet bills. Please send what ever you can afford. She would greatly appreciate the chance to survive and stay in a nice warm home.
http://www.gofundme.com/bh8z7c
I don’t have much to offer for rewards, but this blog will follow Nina’s journey as she grows into a healthy cat! If you leave your address with a donation, we will send you a picture of her (when she is plump and healthy!) and a thank you letter.
Nina thanks you for taking the time to read this post! And may karma bring the best of luck your way!

littleninarescue:

This is Little Nina.
We found her on the side of the road in Cleveland Ohio, covered in mud and getting splashed by cars. I picked her up with intentions of nursing her back to health. The vet was kind enough to give me a free exam, which was enough to tell me that she has a severe upper respiratory infection and extreme malnutrition. Her eyes were glued shit with yellow gunk when I found her. And the vet told me that she thought she was about 5 weeks old, but was the size of a 3 week old kitten.

We already have two cats, both of which are rescues. We have plans on keeping her, but this was such a surprise for us, we didn’t have time to budget in another cat. I was able to get a sample sized tube of antibiotics for her eyes, but she is going to need more very soon. And eventually she will need to be spayed.

I don’t want to have to give her up because we can’t afford to keep her. Nina has a gofundme account set up for her vet bills. Please send what ever you can afford. She would greatly appreciate the chance to survive and stay in a nice warm home.

http://www.gofundme.com/bh8z7c

I don’t have much to offer for rewards, but this blog will follow Nina’s journey as she grows into a healthy cat! If you leave your address with a donation, we will send you a picture of her (when she is plump and healthy!) and a thank you letter.

Nina thanks you for taking the time to read this post! And may karma bring the best of luck your way!

July 2014
23

grues0m-e asked

Usually my dog gets car sick pretty bad. Happened ever since he was a puppy. We've tried everything. Front seat, back seat. In a kennel, in one of those seat belts for dogs (I know they aren't actually seat belts designed for safety) he just never stops moving and within 20 minutes, he pukes. Always. I usually give him a tab of Dramamine and he's okay. I asked my vet if I could give it to him before hand, said it was fine (she's awesome). He's a medium sized dog. About 75 lbs. Hope this helps!

When does he go in the car? If he usually goes in the car to go to undesireable places, such as the vets, then he may be stressed. Since he’s been doing it since he was a puppy he may just be under the impression that this is what you do in the car, because this is what he’s always done in the car. 

Try to keep him forward facing so he doesn’t notice the movement so much, and keep the window cracked. Providing toys may also be useful as a distraction.

-Ry

#grues0m e   #asks   
July 2014
23

korsstingfornybegynnere asked

I just came across this buzzfeed article where they portrayed pit bulls as the friendliest animals there was, pictures of them playing with rabbits and text like 'pit bulls make the best babysitters'. I guess I just want to thank you, because not that long ago I would have found the picture of the dog 'kissing' a rabbit to be adorable, now it just gave me chills.

I hate the idea of pitbulls as “baby sitters” or “nanny dogs,” no dog should be left alone with children regardless of their breed.

-Ry

July 2014
23

wolfforce58205 replied to your post “Do you have any advice for helping motion sick dogs who have the unfortunate necessity to travel in the car often?”

Usually he jumps in excitedly, then gets a little nervous (this has been improving with praise and training), then gets excited, but if the car ride is too long he will vomit. We usually need to take a break after 15-20 minutes for him.

wolfforce58205 replied to your post “Do you have any advice for helping motion sick dogs who have the unfortunate necessity to travel in the car often?”

1 yr. Yes. Prefers SUV w/ seats down & 1 window open (tried different seating options). Goes to dog park, exploring, lake to swim, or groomer/pet store. Used to get nervous about the car but now is excited about rides. Can’t ride more than 15-20 min.

Alright, thanks, That helps to narrow down the potential causes… keeping the windows cracked or down is good, try keeping him forward facing so he sees less of the motion.

Toys can be an excellent distraction, another option is to use a travel crate. Of course you’d have to re-crate train them with the travel crate and then start the process of getting them used to being in the crate whilst in the car, but in the end this may provide a more secure environment and can keep them from looking outside too much, so he doesn’t see as much motion.

-Ry

July 2014
22

wolfforce58205 asked

Do you have any advice for helping motion sick dogs who have the unfortunate necessity to travel in the car often?

Is this an adult dog, or a puppy? If it’s an adult, did it often get sick in the car as a puppy? Where are they seated? Where does the car usually bring them? These can all play a role in canine motion sickness and knowing the answers will better help us help you.

-Ry

July 2014
22

Secondhand Smoke Doubles Cat Health Risk 

Everyone has heard warnings about the effects of secondhand smoke around people, especially children, but what happens to our furry friends when they’re exposed to it? Researchers at Tufts University’s School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts have found that repeated exposure to smoke doubles a cat’s chances of getting malignant lymphoma.

Exactly how many pets die from being exposed to tobacco is unknown. According to Dr. Kerri Marshall, chief veterinarian officer for Trupanion pet insurance, inhaling smoke can cause intense allergies, inflammation and nasal and pulmonary cancers. 

Although pets aren’t mentioned in the latest Surgeon General’s Report, it did mention in 2006 that smoke puts animals at risk. The nation’s biggest nonprofit public health charity, The Legacy Foundation, tries to inspire smokers to quit for the sake of their pets, and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals advocates keeping a smoke-free house when pets dwell within.

One of the leading causes of cat death is lymphoma. According to the Tufts research, repeated exposure to smoke doubled a cat’s chances of getting the cancer. Also, living with a smoker for more than five years increased the risk by four times. As in humans, smoke can also cause a fatal mouth cancer in your pet.

As far as tobacco companies go, they acknowledge smoking risks in humans, but they haven’t mentioned pets. 

Philip Morris USA’s website states the company believes cigarettes cause diseases and aggravates others in non-smokers and that the problems warrant caution. “We haven’t taken a stand on the potential impact on pets,” says David Sylvia, spokesperson for Altria Group, the parent company of Philip Morris.

If you notice the symptoms of cancer in your cat – coughing, little appetite, trouble eating or breathing, drooling, vomiting, nasal discharge bleeding and sneezing – take him or her to the vet right away. Morris Animal Foundation, a Denver-based organization that has been funding pet-cancer research since 1962, says these are key warning signs.

Keep in mind that electronic cigarette vapor still contains nicotine, which is highly poisonous in animals. Along those lines, the biggest danger for your cat is the nicotine used in the cartridges. 

July 2014
22
Via   •   Source

a-fuckmothering-werewolf:

a-fuckmothering-werewolf:

hey guys, I hate to beg for donations and stuff but… We’re about to move, and I really REALLY need to get my dogs microchipped and vaccinated for rabies before we have to get packed up and stuff. I’m getting all of it done at a shelter in my county (Williamson county, Tennessee) so it’s fairly cheap— but I’m still really really low on money. I recently got fired from my job, so I can’t pay for much of anything right now. :<

If you’re feeling generous, just donate to littlefaeriefawn@live.com on paypal. I need to reach $50 ($15 per microchip, $10 per vaccination). If you can’t donate, could you please reblog? ;u; thank you.

h e y guys if you can’t donate even like $1 please just reblog/share because this is rly important ok ;;

July 2014
22

I’m already noticing a pattern with the survey. Most people who have had outdoor cats in the past don’t know the animals fate, they simply stopped showing up one day.

The strictly indoor cats are also more likely to be up to date on their vaccinations. The age ranges for both outdoor and indoor are all over but the oldest one so far is n 18 year old indoor cat, the oldest outdoor cat is 12.

#mod talk   
July 2014
22
Via   •   Source

Indoor vs. Outdoor Cats Survey 

I’ll post the results next Tuesday, by the way.

July 2014
22
Via   •   Source
kittehkats:

The dog-days are almost upon us.  Keep your kitties (and even goggies) safe in the heat.
Some other tips:
Put out multiple water bowls for easy access.  Consider freezing one, or adding ice.
Tie ribbons to the grill of an oscillating fan to encourage your cat to play and cool off at the same time
Place some frozen cooler packs in a rolled up towel, then in your pets favorite bed
Make sure access to the bathroom is clear.  All of that porcelain, enamel and cold water plumbing can keep bathrooms a few degrees cooler than the rest of the house.  Basements too, if available

kittehkats:

The dog-days are almost upon us.  Keep your kitties (and even goggies) safe in the heat.

Some other tips:

  • Put out multiple water bowls for easy access.  Consider freezing one, or adding ice.
  • Tie ribbons to the grill of an oscillating fan to encourage your cat to play and cool off at the same time
  • Place some frozen cooler packs in a rolled up towel, then in your pets favorite bed
  • Make sure access to the bathroom is clear.  All of that porcelain, enamel and cold water plumbing can keep bathrooms a few degrees cooler than the rest of the house.  Basements too, if available